CLIMATE  TRENDS

Brian Gunter, Narooma, NSW, Australia    http://members.westnet.com.au/brigun/casey-temps.html

"Trends are not always trendy"

 

   

 

 

 

TEMPERATURE TRENDS AT CASEY STATION, ANTARCTICA

 

 

 

 

Has the Antarctic continent become significantly warmer in recent years? 

Here is a detailed analysis of the temperature data recorded at Casey station since 1957.  

 

 

 

 

 

Casey station, in Antarctica, was operated by Australia since February 1957. The station is located on the coast of Antarctica (see map) with coordinates -66.28N 110.52E.   

 

 

The raw data were extracted from the website of the Royal Dutch Meteorological Institute (KNMI).  

 

 

Graphical plots are presented below of values of mean temperatures for each of the 12 months and also for each year (January-December).

 

 

A polynomial trend line was fitted through each of the sets of data.

 

 

This study is a more detailed analysis of temperature trends that I have made for 13 long-term stations in Antarctica.  http://members.westnet.com.au/brigun/antarctica-temps.html   That study showed that mean summer, winter and annual temperatures at 10 of the 13 stations also had essentially zero temperature trends over the past 60-70 years.  The three stations located on the more-northerly Antarctic Peninsula had significant increased temperature over that same period.

 

 

MY CONCLUSIONS:

 

 

The temperature at Casey station has varied little over the past 59 years. 

 

Most months have a near-zero trend, but several months have reducing temperatures since about 1980.

 

 

So, there is no evidence of any significant change in the temperature at Casey station over the past 59 years!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANNUAL AND MONTHLY TEMPERATURE TRENDS AT CASEY STATION, ANTARCTICA

   

 

 

Annual

 

 

 

 

January

 

 

 

February

 

 

 

March 

 

 

 

April

 

 

 

 

May

 

 

 

June

 

 

 

July

 

 

 

August

 

 

 

 

September

 

 

 

 

October

 

 

 

 

November

 

 

 

 

December

 

 

 

The Author:

  This article was written by Brian Gunter of Narooma, NSW.  In his previous life Brian was an engineering hydrologist involved over many years in the analysis of rainfall and river flow data for the planning of water resources projects in Australia, Asia and Africa.  In recent years he has been one of the Marine Rescue NSW (previously Royal Volunteer Coastal Patrol) volunteer weather observers who operate the Narooma station for the Bureau of Meteorology.

 

Brian Gunter

brigun@westnet.com.au

1 June 2015